hot topic: lost my credit card :/

Yesterday, my daughter & I were going through a drive through hamburger place to grab a quick lunch and when I looked for my credit card to pay, it was missing!  My heart dropped down to my toes – then I quickly started to look for my credit card & with relief found it in my car.

We can all think of various things we’ve lost in the past & what a horrible feeling it leaves in our thoughts.  So when I recently read Jesus’ 3 parables about lost stuff in Luke 15 (sheep, coin & son), I was very moved by some important things for us to consider:

  • the shepherd, woman & father didn’t quit looking until what was lost had been found:  our heavenly Father never quits & gives up trying to find & reconcile us
  • there was a massive celebration when the lost item / person was found & reconciled:  there was no shame or scolding given to that which was lost, but rather a jubuliant celebration over the recovery & reconciliation
  • being lost can be expressed in lots of different contexts:  the father sought to reconcile not only the renegade son, but also the self-righteous son who remained aloof & detached from his family;  being right doesn’t mean we don’t need to be reconciled 🙂

Risqué or Risky?

There was a chick in Jesus’ life who was very edgy (actually, most of the women that we read about who interacted w Jesus were pretty edgy for their day). This chick had an extremely severe health need & her problem had lasted 12years & only continued to deteriorate despite spending lots of time & money on doctors & various remedies, all to no avail. Her situation was extremely sad not only because of the horrible health problem, but her problem was exacerbated because under Jewish law, she was forbidden to be in public bc of her health problem.
She took a life threatening risk to go out in public & secretly touch the hem of Jesus’ robe – risky.
The conclusion of her risky faith is that she was healed – but here’s the part that really grabs me: Jesus didn’t allow her healing to remain a secret. He called her out to make her healing publicly known – that she was well & could therefore have normal public interactions & restored relationships. Whatever we allow to come into Jesus’ presence gets improved, restored, healed & redeemed 🙂

From trash to treasure :)

I just had an interesting conversation with my kids about how they treat each other when they’re struggling or have had some failure. I’ve noticed that they often don’t want their siblings to know about an area in which they’re struggling because they don’t want to get teased or picked on. Sound familiar? I’ve been thinking about this problem not only with my kids but also with my brothers and sisters in Jesus. Far too often I’ve seen Christians “eat their own”& when we see this kind of treatment it makes us distrustful & reluctant to share about areas in which we struggle or have failure. In my mind, this is a super effective strategy the devil uses to divide & conquer. Jesus personifies redemption & when His disciples failed & had shortcomings, He didn’t toss them in the trash & sever His relationship with them. Jesus is in the restoration & redemption business. As His follower, I want to let His redemption & restoration flow not only to me, but also through me. Just some friendly food for thought on this happy Wednesday 😀

OUCH! rest, ice & elevation

I recently slipped in our big snow storm and hurt my ankle and no, I’m not any good at injuries of any sort.  My norm is just to ignore them & keep going – no time to be gimpy!  Unfortunately, this little ankle thing isn’t responding well to being ignored.

I think the same can be true with us spiritually.  Sometimes there are injuries in our hearts that require some attention.  Here a few ideas that could help:

  • ice:  it cuts back on the swelling and the agitation;  when our hearts are hurt, it’s helpful to cool down before making any decisions or having some conversations (cooling down doesn’t mean simmering to re-load ammunition or nit picking to fester the injury more)
  • elevation:  lifting up our hearts to the Holy Spirit gives space and opportunity for divine involvement, where there is always healing, repair and rejuvenation
  • rest:  sometimes we need to give our hearts a chance to recover and “breath”;  heart trauma or injury often requires some time and processing to get to a place where there can be constructive progress (just be careful that rest doesn’t turn into withdrawal)

Just some helpful ideas for a hurting heart